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Four bad reasons to transfer Universities

March 20th, 2018 by Sarah Adams

A third of university students will transfer courses, or universities at least one time during their undergraduate years, according However, while there are plenty of viable reasons to transfer, doing so is not always the right move. Let's count down the top four reasons to stay the course...

1. You're Homesick

Approximately 16 percent of transfer students switch universities before returning for a second term, according to further figures from the NSCRC. A common reason? Because they miss home. Unfortunately, homesickness is a very real part of the university experience, but the only way past it is through it.

When you start to feel homesick, revisit the reasons why you left home and went to uni. Will switching universities offer a permanent solution, or just a temporary fix?

Also, don't forget that there are plenty of ways to feel connected with loved ones back home thanks to modern technology. Phone calls, video chats, and text messages help bridge the distance without necessitating a move.

2. You're Not Making Friends

Developing meaningful friendships takes time. Rather than throwing up your hands and starting somewhere new where the same set of challenges are sure to await, commit to establishing a social network on campus. Student clubs, study groups, and intramural sports teams offer the chance to connect with like-minded classmates.

And remember: many of your fellow students are facing the same set of challenges. Your efforts in reaching out may deliver a valuable lifeline to another struggling student.

3. Your Classes Are Too Hard (or Too Easy)

Establishing a study schedule and getting a grasp on college-level expectations takes time. If your classes are beyond your capabilities -- or if your capabilities are beyond your classes -- transferring isn't your only recourse. Instead, re-evaluate your course load. Could you be taking different or fewer classes? Are there independent study opportunities which might be more appropriate?

Your academic advisor can offer valuable insights into finding coursework at your ideal academic level, please speak to student support. And remember, while you may initially have to endure dreaded prerequisites, a world of new possibilities opens up once they are completed.

4. You Had One Negative Experience

It's easy to let a single negative event or interaction early on in your academic tenure set the tone for your entire experience. However, bad room-mates, difficult professors, and academic stress are part of campus life. Rather than characterising what could be an otherwise phenomenal four years according to one less-than-ideal experience, commit to rise above and persevere. Running away from a problem is not a solution, and will not help you grow as a person. Instead, learn what you can from the experience and move on with your head held high.

In some cases, transferring is absolutely a smart decision: for example, if your current university doesn't have your major or if financial constraints become a factor. However, because of the significance of the decision, it's essential to make sure you have the right reasons before calling it quits.

Categories: University