Dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD… if THEY succeeded, so can you!

January 26th, 2011 by Sara

In recent weeks the First Tutors team has noticed an increased demand for one to one tuition from students suffering with learning difficulties. Whether this be dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, ADD, ADHD or even mild Asperger's syndrome, they all fall under the HELP ME PLEASE requests from our tutees!

Dyslexia

Many of our tutors have vast experience dealing with students that have learning difficulties. We even have a "special needs" category which displays a list of specialised tutors.

Just one example of a "Rolls Royce" First Tutors profile for special needs: https://www.firsttutors.com/uk/tutor/carol.english.maths.special-needs

BUT it must be stressed that any good tutor giving individualised tuition will maximise the chance of success for a child or adult suffering learning difficulties.

We won't go in to the definitions of each disability classed under the learning difficulties category, there is a minefield of information on the Internet; however, check out English Tutors for dyslexia and Maths tutors for dyscalculia.

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Ending on a positive note, proving that with help most people learn to manage and/or overcome their disability; some becoming worldwide famous celebrities, read on...

Albert Einstein did not speak until the age of 3. Even as an adult Einstein found that searching for words was laborious. He found school work; especially maths difficult and was unable to express himself in written language.

Thomas Alva Edison was unable to read until he was twelve years old and his writing skills were poor throughout his life.

George Washington was unable to spell throughout his life and his grammar usage was very poor.

Tom Cruise is unable to read due to severe dyslexia, he is able to memorize lines and perform on stage and screen.

Winston Churchill failed his sixth grade and suffered from stuttering. He quoted:

"I was on the whole, considerably discouraged by my school days. It was not pleasant to feel oneself so completely outclassed and left behind at the beginning of the race".